Homemade Hot Chocolate Blocks {Low Sugar}

When the cold weather arrives, I crave homemade hot chocolate. It’s one of those simple indulgences that evokes feelings of quiet family time snuggling by the fire. There’s an easy way to ensure that rich, decadent hot chocolate is always at hand during the holiday season: Homemade Hot Chocolate Blocks.

These sweet little hot chocolate blocks are much more flavorful than packaged cocoa, thanks to high quality dark chocolate (my favorite is Guittard), heavy cream, and a touch of vanilla. Even better, this low sugar hot chocolate is half the sugar of a typical hot cocoa mix. Store the blocks in your freezer for quick and easy hot chocolate enjoyment. They make lovely teacher gifts wrapped in cello bags and tied with a festive ribbon.

homemade hot chocolate blocks | jennifer tyler lee | vertical

Homemade Hot Chocolate Blocks

Makes 25 cups
Ours = 2 teaspoons
Theirs* = 4 teaspoons

This homemade hot chocolate is rich and flavorful thanks to dark chocolate, cream, and a touch of vanilla. Using high quality dark chocolate results in better flavor so that added sugar can be reduced by 50% compared to the leading packaged hot cocoa mixes. Finish off your mug with a dollop of unsweetened whipped cream or a few mini marshmallows for an extra special treat.

1 cup heavy cream
20 ounces bittersweet chocolate chips (63 percent cacao)
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
Whole milk for serving
Unsweetened whipped cream or mini marshmallows for serving (optional)

1. Line an 8-by-8-inch baking pan with parchment paper, leaving the edges about 1 inch above the rim of the pan on two sides so you can pull the chocolate out.

2. In a medium heatproof bowl, combine the cream, chocolate, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt. Set the bowl over a saucepan filled with simmering water over medium heat, making sure the bottom of the bowl doesn’t touch the water. Cook until the chocolate is melted and shiny, stirring constantly, about 3 minutes.

3. Pour the mixture into the prepared pan. Refrigerate until fully set, 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

4. Remove the chocolate block from the refrigerator. Pull the chocolate out of the pan and transfer to a cutting board, then peel off the parchment. Mark the block every 1 1/2 inches and then cut across 5 ways and down 5 ways so you have 25 1 1/2-inch squares. To freeze, wrap each block in plastic wrap then place the blocks in a re-sealable bag and refrigerate for 1 week or freeze for 1 month.

5. To serve: In a small saucepan, bring 3/4 cup of whole milk to a gentle simmer over medium-low heat, about 1 to 2 minutes. Be careful not to scorch the milk. Add the chocolate block and stir until fully melted. Serve with unsweetened whipped cream or mini marshmallows.

*A typical hot chocolate mix made with 6oz of whole milk contains 4 teaspoons or 16g of added sugar.

Nutrition Information (made with 3/4 cup whole milk):
Calories: 267 | Added sugar: 2 teaspoons or 8g | Carbohydrates: 21g | Sodium: 105mg | Saturated fats: 34% of calories or 15g | Fiber: 5g | Protein: 8g

Homemade Hot Chocolate Blocks {Low Sugar}
 
This low sugar hot chocolate is rich and flavorful thanks to dark chocolate, cream, and a touch of vanilla. Using high quality dark chocolate results in better flavor so that added sugar can be reduced by 50% compared to the leading packaged hot cocoa mixes. Finish off your mug with a dollop of unsweetened whipped cream or a few mini marshmallows for an extra special treat.
Author:
Recipe type: Beverages, Dessert
Serves: 25
Ingredients
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 20 ounces bittersweet chocolate chips (63 percent cacao)
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • Whole milk for serving
  • Unsweetened whipped cream or mini marshmallows for serving (optional)
Instructions
  1. Line an 8-by-8-inch baking pan with parchment paper, leaving the edges about 1 inch above the rim of the pan on two sides so you can pull the chocolate out.
  2. In a medium heatproof bowl, combine the cream, chocolate, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt. Set the bowl over a saucepan filled with simmering water over medium heat, making sure the bottom of the bowl doesn't touch the water. Cook until the chocolate is melted and shiny, stirring constantly, about 3 minutes.
  3. Pour the mixture into the prepared pan. Refrigerate until fully set, 1½ to 2 hours.
  4. Remove the chocolate block from the refrigerator. Pull the chocolate out of the pan and transfer to a cutting board, then peel off the parchment. Mark the block every 1½ inches and then cut across 5 ways and down 5 ways so you have 25 1½-inch squares. To freeze, wrap each block in plastic wrap then place the blocks in a re-sealable bag and refrigerate for 1 week or freeze for 1 month.
  5. To serve: In a small saucepan, bring ¾ cup of whole milk to a gentle simmer over medium-low heat, about 1 to 2 minutes. Be careful not to scorch the milk. Add the chocolate block and stir until fully melted. Serve with unsweetened whipped cream or mini marshmallows.
Nutrition Information
Calories: 267 Saturated fat: 34% of calories or 15g Carbohydrates: 21g Sugar: 2 teaspoons or 8g Sodium: 105mg Fiber: 5g Protein: 8g

 

By | 2018-11-28T03:40:36+00:00 November 27th, 2018|Beverages, Desserts|0 Comments

About the Author:

Heralded by Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution as “A mom and genius game creator helping kids eat fresh food!”, Jennifer Tyler Lee is an award-winning cookbook author, game creator, and healthy eating advocate. Jennifer has garnered national TV, radio, and print coverage for her family cookbook, The 52 New Foods Challenge, and her nutrition game, Crunch a Color®: The Healthy Eating Game. Jennifer’s work has been spotlighted by Jessica Alba, Michael Pollan, Jamie Oliver, Laurie David, Rachael Ray, US Weekly, The 700 Club, and Oprah.com—among many others. Her fresh approach to cooking together as a family inspired a nationwide series of kids cooking classes at Williams-Sonoma, The 52 New Foods Junior Chef Series, along with an exclusive edition of her book. A former strategy consultant, she lives in the Bay Area with her family.

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