How to Cook Brussels Sprouts Chips: The Insider’s Guide

//How to Cook Brussels Sprouts Chips: The Insider’s Guide

Mistakes to avoid when cooking Brussels Sprouts Chips.

After a season of cooking Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chips nearly every week (thank you, book tour!), I thought it would be helpful to round up a few cooking tips and tricks I’ve learned along the way. There’s good news, and bad news.

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | 2

Bad news: Learning to cook the ultimate Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chips takes a little experimenting. You’re (probably) not going to nail it on your first try. But the fun is in mastering the challenge, right? There’s a blend of art and science here. Be patient, and keep trying.

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | 3

Good news: I may not be able to do all of the work for you, but I can give you a huge head start. Hindsight has its advantages. Below, the tips I’ve consistently found myself sharing when friends and family call for the inside scoop on how to cook Roasted Brussels Sprouts chips like a rock star.

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | 4b

Brussels Sprouts Chips Tip #1: Size Matters

Choose Brussels sprouts that are larger in diameter. They’re easier to peel, which makes prep work faster. Plus, larger sprouts deliver bigger leaves that simply look nicer when they’re roasted. Face it: your kids won’t be swooning over a pan of shriveled up tiny brown bits.

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | 5

Food Waste Tip: To easily peel the sprouts, cut off the ends as you go. But don’t discard the small pieces. Those little gems can be worked into a second dish later in the week. I usually toss them in a baking sheet with a little olive oil and kosher salt to make mini Roasted Brussels Sprouts. My kids always think it’s more fun when we “make it mini.” Or you can sauté them up and toss with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice and a handful of chopped walnuts. Easy.

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | 6

Brussels Sprouts Chips Tip #2: Dry the Leaves

Chips will be crispiest when you start with dry leaves. For best results, peel and wash your sprouts the day before you want to cook them. Spin them in your salad spinner, and then set them on a baking sheet to dry fully. If you’re in a pinch and have to make your chips the same day, be sure to gently pat the leaves with a paper towel to remove excess water. You don’t want steamed Brussels (ewww).

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | 8

Brussels Sprouts Chips Tip #3: Massage the Leaves

For maximum flavor, you really need to work the olive oil and kosher salt into every nook and cranny of those leaves. After you’ve added the oil and salt, use your hands to gently massage it into the leaves. Make sure it’s evenly distributed. Don’t crush the leaves, but do give ‘em a good rub. Chips without olive oil and salt taste like cardboard (IMHO) and will not help you make friends at your dinner table. Taste the leaves before they go into the oven. If the chips taste great before they cook, they’ll taste off-the-charts awesome when they come out of the oven.

This one minute technique video shows you how: Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chips

Brussels Sprouts Chips Tip #4: Give ‘Em Space

Do not be tempted to overload the baking sheet with leaves. Like your kids, you’ll get better-behaved chips if you give everyone a little space. The other common mistakes to avoid when oven-roasting vegetables apply here as well. Use a baking sheet, not a high-sided dish, and try to work with leaves that are close to the same size. Don’t get all crazy on me here, just be in the ballpark. Tell your type-A tendencies to take a break while you make these.

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | space on pan

For the uber-competitive cooks in the crowd, if you’d like to take your Brussels sprouts chips to gold-level status, arrange the leaves on a wire rack set inside your baking sheet. Lifting the leaves off the pan allows the heat in your oven to circulate more evenly and makes for even crispier chips. It does mean extra washing, though, which is why I don’t usually bother with this step. I’m not a big fan of dishes. Your call.

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | wire rack

Brussels Sprouts Chips Tip #5: Use Two Pans

Those delicate leaves shrink a lot when you roast them. What looks like a big batch of chips when you start barely feeds four when you’re finished (make that two if your kids have become Brussels sprouts chips converts). Spread the leaves from one pound of sprouts over two pans.

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | make two pans

I’ll continue to update this post as I discover new tricks for how to cook Brussels Sprouts chips like a pro. I hope you’ll have fun experimenting with this recipe (with or without your kids) and add your comments too. I always love hearing what’s cooking in your kitchen.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chips from The 52 New Foods Challenge

Like potato chips, only 500X better. This recipe for Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chips is one of my favorites from my book, The 52 New Foods Challenge. It features the best part of roasted Brussels sprouts: the crispy, crunchy leaves. Sayonara soggy centers. Bye bye mushy middles. Hello to happy kids devouring every last crispy chip, straight from the pan.

Get the recipe: Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chips

Watch the technique video: Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chips

how to cook brussels sprouts chips | 52 new foods challenge | jennifer tyler lee | pinterest

By | 2018-02-02T14:36:16+00:00 March 31st, 2015|Sides|0 Comments

About the Author:

Heralded by Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution as “A mom and genius game creator helping kids eat fresh food!”, Jennifer Tyler Lee is an award-winning cookbook author, game creator, and healthy eating advocate. Jennifer has garnered national TV, radio, and print coverage for her family cookbook, The 52 New Foods Challenge, and her nutrition game, Crunch a Color®: The Healthy Eating Game. Jennifer’s work has been spotlighted by Jessica Alba, Michael Pollan, Jamie Oliver, Laurie David, Rachael Ray, US Weekly, The 700 Club, and Oprah.com—among many others. Her fresh approach to cooking together as a family inspired a nationwide series of kids cooking classes at Williams-Sonoma, The 52 New Foods Junior Chef Series, along with an exclusive edition of her book. A former strategy consultant, she lives in the Bay Area with her family.

Leave A Comment